Open position: operations specialist

80,000 Hours

80,000 Hours provides research and support to help students and graduates switch into careers that effectively tackle the world’s most pressing problems.

Over one million people visit our website each year, and more than 3,000 people have told us that they’ve significantly changed their career plans due to our work. We’re also the largest single source of people getting involved in the effective altruism community, according to the most recent EA Survey.

The Internal Systems team

The Internal Systems team is here to build the organisation and systems that support 80,000 Hours to achieve its mission.

We oversee 80,000 Hours’ office, finances, and impact evaluation, as well as much of our fundraising, org-wide metrics, tech systems, HR, and recruiting.

Currently, we have two full-time staff (Brenton Mayer and Sashika Coxhead), some part-time staff, and receive support from CEA (our fiscal sponsor).

Role

This role would be excellent experience for someone who wants to build career capital in operations, especially if you could one day see yourself in a more senior operations role (e.g. taking on more management, and perhaps eventually being a Head of Operations or COO).

Your responsibilities will likely include:

  • Creating an outstanding office environment. You’ll hire and manage the team that oversees our beautiful central London office. Your team will be responsible for all the systems that keep the office running smoothly,

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    Engineering

    How can engineers best make a difference?

    Many potential solutions to the top problems we recommend working on include developing and deploying technology — and this often needs engineers.

    Below is a list of pressing global problems and how engineers can help with each.

    If you’re an engineer, you can read through to see if any of these issues appeal to you — and then aim to speak to some people in each area about how your skills could be applied and what the current opportunities are.

    Preventing catastrophic pandemics

    A future pandemic that is much worse than COVID-19 could pose a significant risk to society.

    This is one of our top recommended areas, and has a clear need for engineers, as argued in Biosecurity needs engineers by Will Bradshaw.

    While there is a key role for bioengineers and chemical engineers, physical engineers are also needed. Materials or civil engineers could:

    • Help design physical protection from pathogens, like more effective or more affordable PPE (personal protective equipment) such as gloves and masks, better pathogen containment systems for labs, and systems to reduce pathogen spread in buildings or vehicles.
    • Help improve technologies for monitoring pathogens, like systems for sampling environments and processes for managing and examining samples.

    AI alignment

    We expect AI hardware to be a crucial component of the development of AI. Given the importance of positively shaping the development of AI,

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    #5 – Michelle and Habiba on what they’d tell their younger selves, and the impact of the 1-1 team

    I think trying out different things, and forming your own views on what’s worthwhile, actually stands you in good stead later down the line.

    I think it would be a shame if people went straight to assuming that we’ve got it all worked out and therefore they should only try the things that seem like they are the perfect, most effective things already or something.

    Habiba Islam

    In this episode of 80k After Hours, Rob continues to interview his 80,000 Hours colleagues Michelle Hutchinson and Habiba Islam about the 1-1 team.

    This is the second of a two-part interview. You can find the first part on the original 80,000 Hours Podcast feed.

    In this part, they cover:

    • Whether just encouraging someone young to aspire to more than they currently are is one of the most impactful ways to spend half an hour
    • How much impact the one-on-one team has, the biggest challenges they face as a group, and different paths they could have gone down
    • Whether giving general advice is a doomed enterprise
    • And more

    Who this episode is for:

    • Young people interested in 80,000 Hours
    • People curious about the inner workings of the 1-1 team
    • People who left the first part wanting more

    Who this episode isn’t for:

    • People who left the first part wanting less
    • People who like up-to-date movie recommendations

    Get this episode by subscribing to our more experimental podcast on the world’s most pressing problems and how to solve them: type ‘80k After Hours’ into your podcasting app. Or read the transcript below.

    Producer: Keiran Harris
    Audio mastering: Ben Cordell
    Transcriptions: Katy Moore

    Gershwin – Rhapsody in Blue, original 1924 version” by Jason Weinberger is licensed under creative commons

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    #122 – Michelle Hutchinson & Habiba Islam on balancing competing priorities and other themes from our 1-on-1 careers advising

    There’s definitely some subset of people that we talk to who feel like they’re only doing what they ought to if they do the most impactful thing they possibly could, and spend all their time and all their money helping others…

    I don’t think we should be in the business of pushing ourselves and each other that hard — I think it’s very important to find a career that’s actually going to be fulfilling and sustainable for you, and that allows you the amount of time off that you need.

    Michelle Hutchinson

    One of 80,000 Hours’ main services is our free one-on-one careers advising, which we provide to around 1,000 people a year. Today we speak to two of our advisors, who have each spoken to hundreds of people — including many regular listeners to this show — about how they might be able to do more good while also having a highly motivating career.

    Before joining 80,000 Hours, Michelle Hutchinson completed a PhD in Philosophy at Oxford University and helped launch Oxford’s Global Priorities Institute, while Habiba Islam studied politics, philosophy, and economics at Oxford University and qualified as a barrister.

    Want to get free one-on-one advice from our team? We’re here to help.

    We’ve helped thousands of people formulate their plans and put them in touch with mentors.

    We’ve expanded our ability to deliver one-on-one meetings so are keen to help more people than ever before.

    If you’re a regular listener to the show we’re particularly likely to want to speak with you, either now or in the future.

    Learn about and apply for advising

    In this conversation, they cover many topics that recur in their advising calls, and what they’ve learned from watching advisees’ careers play out:

    • What they say when advisees want to help solve overpopulation
    • How to balance doing good against other priorities that people have for their lives
    • Why it’s challenging to motivate yourself to focus on the long-term future of humanity, and how Michelle and Habiba do so nonetheless
    • How they use our latest guide to planning your career
    • Why you can specialise and take more risk if you’re in a group
    • Gaps in the effective altruism community it would be really useful for people to fill
    • Stories of people who have spoken to 80,000 Hours and changed their career — and whether it went well or not
    • Why trying to have impact in multiple different ways can be a mistake

    The episode is split into two parts: the first section on The 80,000 Hours Podcast, and the second on our new 80k After Hours. This is a shameless attempt to encourage listeners to our first show to subscribe to our second feed.

    That second part covers:

    • Whether just encouraging someone young to aspire to more than they currently are is one of the most impactful ways to spend half an hour
    • How much impact the one-on-one team has, the biggest challenges they face as a group, and different paths they could have gone down
    • Whether giving general advice is a doomed enterprise

    Get this episode by subscribing to our podcast on the world’s most pressing problems and how to solve them: type ‘80,000 Hours’ into your podcasting app. Or read the transcript below.

    Producer: Keiran Harris
    Audio mastering: Ben Cordell
    Transcriptions: Katy Moore

    Continue reading →

    Expression of interest: writer

    Why 80,000 Hours?

    80,000 Hours’ mission is to get talented people working on the world’s most pressing problems. The effective altruism community, of which we are a part, is growing in reach and now includes funding bodies with over $40 billion to allocate in total. But how do we make sure people are pursuing the right kinds of work in order to turn all those resources into long-term impact? This is the problem 80,000 Hours is trying to solve.

    We’ve had over eight million visitors to our website (with over 100,000 hours of reading time per year), and more than 3,000 people have now told us that they’ve significantly changed their career plans due to our work. 80,000 Hours is also the largest single source of people getting involved in the effective altruism community, according to the most recent EA Survey.

    If you join us as a writer, you’d likely be one of the most widely read writers in effective altruism.

    The role

    As a writer at 80,000 Hours, your work would involve:

    • Framing, researching, outlining, and writing articles
    • Generating ideas for additional articles
    • Helping with others’ writing by providing comments
    • Generally helping grow the impact of the site

    Some of the types of pieces you’d help work on include:

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      23 career choice heuristics

      We decided to make a list of all of the career choice heuristics we could think of — see below. Many of these are stated as if completely true, even though we think they aren’t. We invite you to add any additional heuristics you have in the comments of the original post.

      • Scale, number helped — do something that impacts many people positively
      • Scale, degree helped — do something that impacts people to a great positive degree
      • Neglectedness — do something that few others are doing or that won’t be done counterfactually
      • Tractability — do something that makes significant progress on a problem
      • Moments of progress — notice where progress happens in your life and find a career path that integrates those
      • Strong team — if you haven’t worked well alone, join an excellent team
      • Likable people — join a team of people that you like
      • Mental well-being — do something that is optimized for being good for your mental health
      • Team smarter than you — join a team where most people are smarter than you
      • Be a thought or org leader — roughly, there are two types of leaders – thought leaders and org leaders; figure out which type you are more likely to be and optimize for succeeding at that type
      • Learn from leaders — learn from the leaders who you most want to be like
      • Maximize learning/skills,

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        #3 – Alex Lawsen on his advice for students

        If you feel like you’re in a state where you are not really doing work that’s that useful, and you are also not really relaxing — the claim I want to make is that it is strictly better to be actually relaxing.

        Because if you are actually relaxing, you will have the capacity to work in the future, whereas if you stay in this state forever, you will never recover enough to get out of it.

        Alex Lawsen

        In this episode of 80k After Hours, Keiran Harris interviews 80,000 Hours advisor (and former high school teacher) Alex Lawsen about his advice for students.

        We cover:

        • When half-assing something is a good idea
        • When you should actually learn things vs just try to seem smart
        • Why you should shift your focus over the academic year
        • Novel tips for preparing for exams
        • What to do if you struggle with motivation
        • What to do when you have bad teachers
        • How students should think about exploring and experimenting
        • Bad approaches to learning
        • How to think about personal goals
        • When to start thinking about your career seriously
        • And more

        Who this episode is for:

        • Students, parents, and teachers
        • People who know a student, parent, or teacher
        • People with an interest in improving education

        Who this episode isn’t for:

        • People who never interact with students, parents, or teachers
        • People who get mad when an 80,000 Hours podcast doesn’t feature Rob Wiblin

        Get this episode by subscribing to our more experimental podcast on the world’s most pressing problems and how to solve them: type ‘80k After Hours’ into your podcasting app. Or read the transcript below.

        Producer: Keiran Harris
        Audio mastering: Ryan Kessler
        Transcriptions: Katy Moore

        Gershwin – Rhapsody in Blue, original 1924 version” by Jason Weinberger is licensed under creative commons

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        #2 – Rob and Keiran on the philosophy of The 80,000 Hours Podcast

        By allowing people to just cut things out afterwards with the benefit of hindsight, it does mean that they don’t have to be cagey at the time. They can say their thing and then see afterwards — maybe it’s actually fine to put out; maybe it’s not going to be a problem.

        And they don’t have to be doing two things at once in their head — both trying to figure out how to communicate their actual views, and also thinking, “How is this going to be used against me at some point in the future?”

        Rob Wiblin

        In this episode of 80k After Hours, Rob Wiblin and Keiran Harris are interviewed by Kearney Capuano and ​​Aaron Bergman of the new podcast All Good about what goes on behind the scenes at The 80,000 Hours Podcast.

        We cover:

        • The history and philosophy of The 80,000 Hours Podcast
        • The nuts and bolts of how we make the show
        • Rob’s bad habits as an interviewer
        • Topics we try to avoid
        • Critiques of the show
        • The pros and cons of podcasting vs other media
        • Our position in the effective altruism community
        • Whether there’s an optimism bias in the EA community
        • Unifying themes of Rob’s and Keiran’s careers
        • Advice for other podcasters
        • And more

        Who this episode is for:

        • Fans of The 80,000 Hours Podcast
        • New podcasters
        • Two 80,000 Hours employees who love the sound of their own voice

        Who this episode isn’t for:

        • People who’ve never heard of The 80,000 Hours Podcast
        • People who only want to learn about more important topics
        • People who hate podcasts

        Get this episode by subscribing to our more experimental podcast on the world’s most pressing problems and how to solve them: type ‘80k After Hours’ into your podcasting app. Or read the transcript below.

        Producer: Keiran Harris
        Audio mastering: Ben Cordell
        Transcriptions: Katy Moore

        Gershwin – Rhapsody in Blue, original 1924 version” by Jason Weinberger is licensed under creative commons

        Continue reading →

        Introducing 80k After Hours

        As The 80,000 Hours Podcast has developed over the last few years, we’ve found ourselves experimenting more with different types of content.

        Things like audio versions of some of our best articles, or less formal chats between team members, or novel topics (like our episode on having a successful career with depression, anxiety, and imposter syndrome).

        But different types of content have different audiences, and some people who love classic episodes with Rob will understandably have no interest in experimental episodes with other folks on the team (or vice versa: maybe some people love everyone else on the team but can’t stand Rob!)

        That’s why we’ve created 80k After Hours.

        It’s a new podcast that includes a much wider variety of content than you’ve come to expect from the original feed.

        It’ll mostly still explore the best ways to do good — and some episodes will be much more laser-focused on careers than most original episodes — but we’re going to feel more comfortable with throwing things up there just because they’re fun or entertaining too.

        We’ll also feel fine with producing some content for much narrower audiences.

        One of our inaugural episodes with Alex Lawsen — on his advice to students — won’t be for everyone. But if you’re a student, a teacher, or a parent,

        Continue reading →

          #121 – Matthew Yglesias on avoiding the pundit's fallacy and how much military intervention can be used for good

          Workaday politicians running for office are probably better informed about the state of public opinion than you are.

          And if you are finding yourself baffled as to why someone won’t say something or embrace something that you think they should, it’s probably because their surveys indicate that it’s not that popular, and maybe try to be a little less mad.

          Matthew Yglesias

          If you read polls saying that the public supports a carbon tax, should you believe them? According to today’s guest — journalist and blogger Matthew Yglesias — it’s complicated, but probably not.

          Interpreting opinion polls about specific policies can be a challenge, and it’s easy to trick yourself into believing what you want to believe. Matthew invented a term for a particular type of self-delusion called the ‘pundit’s fallacy’: “the belief that what a politician needs to do to improve his or her political standing is do what the pundit wants substantively.”

          If we want to advocate not just for ideas that would be good if implemented, but ideas that have a real shot at getting implemented, we should do our best to understand public opinion as it really is.

          The least trustworthy polls are published by think tanks and advocacy campaigns that would love to make their preferred policy seem popular. These surveys can be designed to nudge respondents toward the desired result — for example, by tinkering with question wording and order or shifting how participants are sampled. And if a poll produces the ‘wrong answer’, there’s no need to publish it at all, so the ‘publication bias’ with these sorts of surveys is large.

          Matthew says polling run by firms or researchers without any particular desired outcome can be taken more seriously. But the results that we ought to give by far the most weight are those from professional political campaigns trying to win votes and get their candidate elected because they have both the expertise to do polling properly, and a very strong incentive to understand what the public really thinks.

          First and foremost, that means representing issues as they would be in a hotly contested campaign. If someone says that they sure like the idea of taxing carbon, how much do they still like it when they find out it means their electricity bills would be $100 higher, and gas will cost 20 cents more a gallon? And do they still like it when they know one of the candidates is against it and says it will cost local jobs? This sort of progressive ‘stress testing’ is more work, but can lead researchers to very different conclusions than just asking people favour ‘policy X’.

          The problem is, campaigns run these expensive surveys because they think that having exclusive access to reliable information will give them a competitive advantage. As a result, they often don’t publish the findings, and instead use them to shape what their candidate says and does.

          Journalists like Matthew can call up their contacts within campaigns and get a summary from people they trust. But being unable to publish the polling itself, they’re unlikely to be able to persuade sceptics.

          That’s a pain and a legitimately hard problem to get around. But when assessing what ideas are winners, one thing Matthew would like everyone to keep in mind is that politics is competitive, and politicians aren’t (all) stupid. If advocating for your pet idea were a great way to win elections, someone would try it and win, and others would copy. If none of the pros are talking about your hobby horse, it might be because they know something you don’t.

          One other thing to check that’s more reliable than polling is real-world experience. For example, voters may say they like a carbon tax on the phone — but the very liberal Washington State roundly rejected one in ballot initiatives in 2016 and 2018.

          Of course you may want to advocate for what you think is best, even if it wouldn’t pass a popular vote in the face of organised opposition. The public’s ideas can shift, sometimes dramatically and unexpectedly. But at least you’ll be going into the debate with your eyes wide open.

          In this extensive conversation, host Rob Wiblin and Matthew also cover:

          • How should a humanitarian think about US military interventions overseas?
          • From an ‘effective altruist’ perspective, was the US wrong to withdraw from Afghanistan?
          • Has NATO ultimately screwed over Ukrainians by misrepresenting the extent of its commitment to their independence?
          • What philosopher does Matthew think is underrated?
          • How big a risk is ubiquitous surveillance?
          • What does Matthew think about wild animal suffering, anti-ageing research, and autonomous weapons?
          • And much more

          Get this episode by subscribing to our podcast on the world’s most pressing problems and how to solve them: type 80,000 Hours into your podcasting app. Or read the transcript below.

          Producer: Keiran Harris
          Audio mastering: Ben Cordell
          Transcriptions: Katy Moore

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          Space governance

          Humanity’s long-run future could be vast in scale and duration, because almost all of it could lie beyond Earth. As private interest in space increases, early work on space governance could positively shape that spacefaring future, and make it less likely that a future in space goes irreversibly wrong. Of course, it also matters that humanity avoids catastrophe in the meantime, and space governance focused on arms control and diplomacy can help here too — mostly by reducing the risk of great power conflict. However, the path to making a really important difference on these issues looks much less clear and robust than in some of our other top recommended areas.

          Continue reading →

          Expression of interest: popular writing consultant

          Why 80,000 Hours?

          80,000 Hours’ mission is to get talented people working on the world’s most pressing problems. The effective altruism community, of which we are a part, is growing in reach and now includes funding bodies with over $40 billion to allocate in total. But how do we turn all those resources into long-term impact? This is the problem 80,000 Hours is trying to solve.

          We’ve had over 8 million visitors to our website (with over 100,000 hours of reading time per year), and more than 3,000 people have now told us that they’ve significantly changed their career plans due to our work. 80,000 Hours is also the largest single source of people getting involved in the effective altruism community, according to the most recent EA Survey.

          The role

          We’re looking for a contractor to give our research and writing team regular advice and feedback on their blog posts, articles, and newsletters — helping them produce pieces that are as compelling and engaging as possible. This would mean giving advice about the structure and content of new pieces, and editing drafts to make them punchier and more grabbing.

          Some examples of the types of pieces you’d help work on:

          Continue reading →

            Software engineering

            On December 31, 2021, the most valuable company on Earth was Apple, worth around $3 trillion. After that came Microsoft, at $2.5 trillion, then Google (officially Alphabet) at $1.9 trillion, then Amazon at $1.5 trillion.

            On December 31, 2020, the four most valuable companies were: Apple, Microsoft, Amazon, and Google.

            On December 31, 2019, the four most valuable companies were: Apple, Microsoft, Google, and Amazon.

            And on December 31, 2018, the four most valuable companies were: Microsoft, Apple, Amazon, and Google.

            If you’re anything like me, you’re starting to spot a pattern here.

            Revenue in software has grown from $400 billion in 2016 to $500 billion in 2021, and is projected to reach $800 billion by 2026.

            Software has an increasing and overwhelming importance in our economy — and everything else in our society. High demand and low supply makes software engineering well-paid, and often enjoyable.

            But we also think that, if you’re trying to make the world a better place, software engineering could be a particularly good way to help.

            This review owes a lot to helpful discussions with (and comments from) Andy Jones, Ozzie Gooen, Jeff Kaufman, Sasha Cooper, Ben Kuhn, Nova DasSarma, Kamal Ndousse, Ethan Alley, Ben West, Ben Mann, Tom Conerly, Zac Hatfield-Dodds, and George McGowan. Special thanks go to Roman Duda for our previous review of software engineering, on which this was based.

            Continue reading →

            #120 – Audrey Tang on what we can learn from Taiwan’s experiments with how to do democracy

            I’m pretty excited about democracy as a social technology.

            I don’t think many people see democracy as a set of technologies yet, but I think that’s a very useful view, because when you analyse democracy in terms of social technology — of bandwidth, of latency, of things like that — then new modes of thought become more natural.

            Audrey Tang

            In 2014 Taiwan was rocked by mass protests against a proposed trade agreement with China that was about to be agreed to without the usual Parliamentary hearings. Students invaded and took over the Parliament. But rather than chant slogans, instead they livestreamed their own parliamentary debate over the trade deal, allowing volunteers to speak both in favour and against.

            Instead of polarising the country more, this so-called Sunflower Student Movement ultimately led to a bipartisan consensus that Taiwan should open up its government. That process has gradually made it one of the most communicative and interactive administrations anywhere in the world.

            Today’s guest — programming prodigy Audrey Tang — initially joined the student protests to help get their streaming infrastructure online. After the students got the official hearings they wanted and went home, she was invited to consult for the government. And when the government later changed hands, she was invited to work in the ministry herself.

            During six years as the country’s ‘Digital Minister’ she has been helping Taiwan increase the flow of information between institutions and civil society and launched original experiments trying to make democracy itself work better.

            That includes developing new tools to identify points of consensus between groups that mostly disagree, building social media platforms optimised for discussing policy issues, helping volunteers fight disinformation by making their own memes, and allowing the public to build their own alternatives to government websites whenever they don’t like how they currently work.

            As part of her ministerial role, Audrey also sets aside time each week to help online volunteers working on government-related tech projects get the help they need. How does she decide who to help? She doesn’t — that decision is made by members of an online community who upvote the projects they think are best.

            According to Audrey, a more collaborative mentality among the country’s leaders has helped increase public trust in government, and taught bureaucrats that they can (usually) trust the public in return.

            Innovations in Taiwan may offer useful lessons to people who want to improve humanity’s ability to make decisions and get along in large groups anywhere in the world. We cover:

            • Why it makes sense to treat Facebook as a nightclub
            • The value of having no reply button, and of getting more specific when you disagree
            • Quadratic voting and funding
            • Audrey’s experiences with the Sunflower Student Movement
            • Technologies Audrey is most excited about
            • Conservative anarchism
            • What Audrey’s day-to-day work looks like
            • Whether it’s ethical to eat oysters
            • And much more

            Get this episode by subscribing to our podcast on the world’s most pressing problems and how to solve them: type 80,000 Hours into your podcasting app. Or read the transcript below.

            Producer: Keiran Harris
            Audio mastering: Ben Cordell
            Transcriptions: Katy Moore

            Continue reading →

            Founder of new projects tackling top problems

            Why might founding a new project be high impact?

            Creating an organisation that persists without you is a route to having a lot of impact in general, but the need for founders within the problems we focus on is unusually pressing right now. This is because many of these problems have seen a large increase in available funding in the last few years — reaching tens of billions of dollars — so there’s a greater need than ever for new organisations that can effectively deploy this funding.

            There are also more and more ideas for new projects — and people willing to work at them — but founders remain comparatively rare, so it seems like founders might be the key bottleneck right now.

            Someone with the right profile, idea, and plan could plausibly be given several hundred thousand dollars fairly quickly to test out their idea, with the potential to scale that to tens of millions of dollars per year within several years if it’s promising after testing.

            There is even interest in founding ‘megaprojects’ that could effectively deploy $100 million per year.

            Even a moderate chance of success could easily make this your highest-impact option.

            Founding a project can also be among the best options for building your career capital, since it’s impressive and you’ll probably learn a huge amount.

            You can learn more about what the recent growth in resources available implies about priorities for our readers in this talk.

            Continue reading →

            Open position: Head of Job Board

            80,000 Hours is hiring a Head of Job Board to lead the job board. They will be responsible for setting and executing strategy to grow the job board’s impact, as well as managing and hiring the job board team.

            More than 180,000 users visited the job board in 2021. Over the next few years, we hope to grow the job board to the point where millions of people per year use it to find out about impactful jobs.

            This role is based in London, UK. The salary will vary based on your skills and experience, but the starting salary for someone with five years of relevant experience would be approximately £72,000 per year.

            To apply for this role, please complete this application form by 11pm GMT on Sunday, 27 February 2022.

            We are offering a £1000 referral bonus to anyone outside the Centre for Effective Altruism who suggests a successful candidate we didn’t otherwise have on our radar. Please email [email protected] with your referrals.

            Continue reading →

              Our advisors want to talk with more people than ever before

              Last year, 80,000 Hours’ advisors spoke to more people than ever before — and we are hoping to help even more people this year! If 80,000 Hours’ content resonates with you, and you want to get help applying the ideas to your career, then apply to speak with our team.

              What we did in 2021

              2021 was a landmark year for the 80,000 Hours one-on-one team:

              • We had over 800 advising calls. That’s the most calls per year in our 10-year history!
              • We hired two new advisors, Alex Lawsen and Matt Reardon, to join Habiba Islam on the team. That means we now have more people focused on helping people one-on-one than ever before.
              • We spoke to about 50% of people who applied — and when we didn’t speak to people ourselves, we often connected them with someone else, or sent them resources to help with their career planning.

              We plan to continue to expand our service and help more people to find high-impact careers in 2022. So if it sounds like we can help you, apply now!

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                The twelve 80,000 Hours 2021 releases that affected our staff most

                In 2021, we released over 20 new articles and blog posts, plus over 30 new podcast episodes.

                It was a lot to keep up with! So I asked my colleagues at 80,000 Hours to recommend some of their favourites from last year.

                Below are their top picks.

                Podcast episode #100 — Having a successful career with depression, anxiety, and imposter syndrome

                Lots of the team found Keiran Harris’s interview with our chief of staff, Howie Lempel, particularly powerful (and a few of us, myself included, have struggled with many of the issues Howie discusses) — so much so that the majority of my colleagues thought of this release first when I asked them to recommend their favourite.

                Alex Lawsen, one of our advisors, describes the episode’s impact on him:

                “I had to listen to Howie’s podcast episode over the course of a few days because of how intense its effect on me was; although I’ve never had an episode as difficult as the one he described, the thought patterns felt very familiar. The advice he gives is just about the best I’ve ever heard on mental health: things like noticing when something has become aversive and then making it a top priority, pre-writing an email in case of something like a mental health crisis to minimise the negative repercussions, or considering whether you should see a therapist or seek a diagnosis — all advice I’ve taken and benefited hugely from.

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                  Open position: Advisor

                  We’re looking for new colleagues to join our team of advisors.

                  • Our advisors talk one-on-one to talented and altruistic applicants in order to help them find the highest impact career they can.
                  • We’ve found that experience with coaching is not necessary – everything from management consulting to global priorities research has helped someone be a good fit.
                  • London-based role with starting salary around £65,000.

                  80,000 Hours’ mission

                  80,000 Hours’ mission is to get talented people working on the world’s most pressing problems. The effective altruism community, of which we are a part, is growing in reach and now includes funding bodies with over $40 billion to allocate in total. But how do we turn all those resources into long-term impact? This is the problem 80,000 Hours is trying to solve.

                  We’ve had over 8 million visitors to our website, and more than 3,000 people have now told us that they’ve significantly changed their career plans due to our work. 80,000 Hours is also the largest single source of people getting involved in the effective altruism community, according to the most recent EA Survey.

                  The 1on1 team

                  The 1on1 team at 80,000 Hours takes people from “interested in the ideas and want to help” to “actually working to solve pressing world problems.” For example, Sophie Rose applied for advising in 2019. We helped her decide to focus on biosecurity and start working in the field.

                  Continue reading →